Joseph Conard's Heart of Darknesss Themes

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ALMOST A VOYAGEJOSEPH CONRAD‘HEART OF DARKNESS’THROUGH HISTORY, FICTION AND TRUTH PERCEPTIONS
INJOSEPH CONRAD’SHEART OF DARKNESSCONTENTI. SENTENCE OUTLINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P 3INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P 3BODY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P 3SUBCHAPTER I:The conditions of writing the ’Heart of Darkness’. .. P 3SUBCHAPTER II: Two journeys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. P 5SUBCHAPTER III:Journey to Congo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P 5SUBCHAPTER IV:Consciousness ‘journey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. P 7SUBCHAPTER V: History, fiction and truth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P 8SUBCHAPTER VI: Darkness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P 9SUBCHAPTER VII: The horror! The horror!’. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P 9CONCLUSIONII. ABSTRACT . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P 3III. KEY WORDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P 3IV. THE PAPER (THE BODY) . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P 4V. REFERENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P 10ALMOST A VOYAGETHROUGH HISTORY, FICTION AND TRUTH PERCEPTIONSINJOSEPH CONRAD’SHEART OF DARKNESS
I.SENTENCE OUTLINE:1. Introduction:Joseph Conrad’s writing treats issues like imperialism and its effects. In this paper I have tried toemphasis some of my points of view watching the main themes approached by the author, the main’scharacter transformations during one long voyage and the historical background which triggered a newsymbolic novella where nothing is what it seems at first sight.Another important issue is the symbol used for show the preference for the supernatural over real.Moreover, the history is combined with the fiction and the truth than all effects and aspects appear inhigh contrast.2. Body: 2.1.:The conditions of writing the ’Heart of Darkness’:this part shows which was thebackground on which Joseph Conrad wrote the novella.2.2:Two journeys:the second part of the paper shows the two kinds of voyage taken by theCaptain Charlie Marlow2.3.: Journey to Congo –outerjourney of the Captain Marlow2.4.: Consciousness ‘journey –inner journey in the subconscious of Marlow’s character2.5.:History, fiction and truth:here is shown the background and the history which started thewriting, what might be fiction and what might be true.2.6.:Darkness:this is one of the symbols which occurs in the novella2.7.: ‘The horror! The horror!’ -These are the last words of Kurtz, which only Marlow fullyunderstand.3. Conclusion:In conclusion I think it is clear that Joseph Conrad succeeded to capture m any aspects of the corruptingpower.‘A clearer depiction of colonialism and its effects – there can also be found a greater degree ofsubjectivity(...) [his] concern was with the inner life of characters.’(Carter, R. & McRae, J. 1997: 392-393)1.II.ABSTRACT:This paper presents the issue of one of the Joseph Conrad’s writings, ‘Heart of Darkness’, dealing with theidea of colonialism and imperialism, with the issue of the white men supremacy and the power which makesthe man bad and mad. It is a corrupting power, a power which transforms human personality, whichtransforms a man, supposed to be civilized, into a savage. Moreover, the action’s place brings in front ofreader’s eyes all these aspects in a high contrast. Another important feature of this paper is the observationswhich are made on the two kinds of journey made by the main character of the novella, Charlie Marlow, andthe relevance of some symbols like darkness in the life experience of the same character. The paper alsotreats a part of Conrad’s theory and historical view on the period of the imperialism and great conquers ofthe Black Continent and the conditions in which ‘Heart of Darkness’ was written.III.KEY WORDS: journey, slaves, darkness, human, character, transformation, life.IV.Almost a voyage through history, fiction and truth perceptions in Joseph Conrad’s“Heart of Darkness”1My emphasis
1. Joseph Conrad’s writing treats issues like imperialism and its effects. In this paper Ihave tried to emphasis some of my points of view watching the main themes approachedby the author, the main’s character transformations during one long voyage and thehistorical background which triggered a new symbolic novella where nothing is what itseems at first sight.Another important issue is the symbol used for show the preference for the supernaturalover real. Moreover, the history is combined with the fiction and the truth than all effectsand aspects appear in high contrast.2.1:The conditions of writing the ’Heart of Darkness’Joseph Conrad had a different view over the society and over all that means human beingmostly after he saw many awful things. He wrote the novella ‘Heart of Darkness’ afterConrad himself was in a journey in many countries, including the African state. Thenovella is a way of saying things about a world that Conrad saw. ‘Joseph Conrad wasanother novelist who used the wider world beyond England as the setting for hisexplorations in character and motive. Conrad’s novel has a variety of locations whichreflect his own extensive travels, mainly as a merchant seaman’(Carter, R. & McRae, J.1997: 406).His writing can be included in the Symbolism because of the many symbols which occurduring the actions. Other feature of the same novella would be the fact that it is a piece ofwork from colonial literature written in the manner of a frame story. One of the majorcharacteristic is the preference of the symbolic over the real.‘(...) he uses sea experience inremote places as a mean of exploring human characters and English codes of honour andloyalty in particular.’(Carter, R. & McRae, J. 1997: 406).Conrad’s themes merely develop, broaden, and open up in the larger world beyond theconfirmed, masculine world of the ship’.(Carter, R. & McRae, J. 1997: 407).2.2:Two journeys.
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