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Approaches to Negotiations: A Study and Comparison of "Getting to Yes" by Roger Fisher and "Starting with No" by Jim Camp

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Added on  2023-04-23

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This paper compares the different approaches to negotiations in "Getting to Yes" by Roger Fisher and "Starting with No" by Jim Camp. It recognizes the core elements of principled negotiation and enhances the knowledge regarding negotiation approaches.

Approaches to Negotiations: A Study and Comparison of "Getting to Yes" by Roger Fisher and "Starting with No" by Jim Camp

   Added on 2023-04-23

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Running Head: EDUCATION 1
Approaches to negotiations
Author's Name
Institutional Affiliation
Introduction
Approaches to Negotiations: A Study and Comparison of "Getting to Yes" by Roger Fisher and "Starting with No" by Jim Camp_1
EDUCATION 2
Although there are different approaches to negotiation, the purpose behind is common
and which is to find an amicable resolution between conflicting parties with the help of a
communication process. The final solution must be acceptable to both, and each party tries to
negotiate to get the best possible outcomes. However, the final outcome depends on the
approach. The paper makes a study and comparison of the different approaches to negotiations in
"Getting to Yes" by Roger Fisher and “Starting with No," by Jim Camp. The purpose behind is
to recognize the core elements of principled negotiation and enhance the knowledge regarding
negotiation approaches.
“Start with No” by Jim Camp offers a viable alternative for the negotiation approach in
today’s prevailing environment. The negotiation coach asserts on the right to say” no” by a party
to conclude favorably through various deals and transactions. According to Camp (2011), saying
no and walking away politely is where one has absolute control in any situation. This is how one
can be in a controlling position when negotiating. He suggests that if the clients entering into
every negotiation finds that the offer does not meet their expectations, they should simply say a
polite No and walk out According to Camp (2011) Win-win solution was once considered to be a
prime example for business negotiation, but it may lead to one party compromising
unnecessarily. Win-win negotiations often play on the emotions and desire and take advantage to
make the deal. The author introduces a decision-based negotiation that is devoid of those
emotions and teaches one on how to focus on the behavior to negotiate with the other party
successfully. Camp concludes his book with certain rules to remember. Every negotiation must
have the place for “no.” One can control their behavior if they have a clear agenda and vision.
Sometimes “no” is a lot better than “yes” and the negotiation is over when you want it to be over
(Camp, 2011).
Approaches to Negotiations: A Study and Comparison of "Getting to Yes" by Roger Fisher and "Starting with No" by Jim Camp_2

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