Disparate Impact:  What Do the Statistics Mean?

Added on - 20 Sep 2019

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DISCUSSION QUESTION TO ANSWER;Review the Chapter 2 Application"Disparate Impact:What Do the Statistics Mean?"starting atthe bottom of page 85.As stated in question #2, what do you recommend regarding standards orguidelines for deciding whether statistical differences reflect discrimination?THE BELOW PARAGRAPH HIGHLIGHTED IN YELLOW WAS TAKEN FROM THE TEXTREGARDING DISPARATE IMPACTDisparate Impact.Disparate impact, also known as adverse impact, focuses on the effect of employment practices,rather than on the motive or intent underlying them. Accordingly, the emphasis here is on the needfor direct evidence that, as a result of a protected characteristic, people are being adversely affectedby a prac-tice. Statistical evidence must be presented to support a claim of adverse impact. 15Three types of statistical evidence may be used, and these are shown in Exhibit 2.5. Refer to “LegalIssues” in Chapters 3 and 7 for elaboration.Shown first in the exhibit are applicant flow statistics,which look at differences in selection rates (proportion of applicants hired) among different groupsfor a particu-lar job. If the differences are large enough, this suggests that the effect of the selec-tionsystem is discriminatory. In the example, the selection rate for men is .50 (or 50%) and for women itis .11 (or 11%), suggesting the possibility of discrimination.A second type of statistical evidenceinvolves the use of stock statistics. Here, the percentage of women or minorities actually employedin a job category is com-pared with their availability in the relevant population. Relevant is defined interms of such things as “qualified,” “interested,” or “geographic.” In the example shown, there is adisparity in the percentage of minorities employed (10%) compared with their availability (30%),which suggests their underutilization.The third type of evidence involves the use of concentrationstatistics. Here, the percentages of women or minorities in various job categories are compared tosee if they are concentrated in certain workforce categories. In the example shown, women areconcentrated in clerical jobs (97%), men are concentrated in production (85%) and managerial(95%) jobs, and men and women are roughly equally concentrated in sales jobs (45% and 55%,respectively).Copyright | McGraw-Hill Higher Education | Staffing Organizations | Edition 8 | Printed fromwww.chegg.com
THE SCREEN SHOT OF THE EXHIBIT BELOW IS THE EXHIBIT THE PROFESSOR ISREFERING TO FORMULATE OUR OPINION ON REGARDING DATA THEREIN.EXHIBIT 2-5 (AS STATED IN TEXT BOOK)
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