Mass Customization in Footwear Industry

Added on - 15 Oct 2020

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MASS CUSTOMIZATION IN FOOTWEAR INDUSTRYA CASE STUDYProject and Operational ManagementSubmitted By:Muhammad Tayyab2016-ME-92Submitted To:Dr. Touseef AizedMechanical EngineeringUniversity of Engineering and TechnologyLahore
Abstract:The idea of mass personalization is one of the main problems of organizational managementphilosophy and action. Customers want a wide range of goods and maintain competitivepurchase prices. Manufacturers must then build technologies and processes to deliver goodsand services at minimal to no charge to their specific customers. It can only be achieved bycombining factory processes for a output reaching mass manufacturing. This paper discussesmass personalization in the footwear industry and develops and implements the definition ofa Slovenian footwear manufacturer.
Contents1)Introduction: ....................................................................................................................... 42)MAST CUSTOMIZATION APPLICATION IN FOOTWEAR ....................................... 53)ALPINA Configuration Program A CASE STUDY .......................................................... 64)Conclusion: ....................................................................................................................... 105)Reference: ......................................................................................................................... 11
1)Introduction:The goal is historically to individualize products and services by allowing competitive ratesto be charged for the additional benefit of a product that satisfies the client's uniquerequirements. The existing scenario varies when the consumers expect reasonably good price,operation, flexibility or accessibility levels, while selling pricing is advantageous or, viceversa, manufacturers must follow certain pricing conditions as the commodity is solddifferently.A fairly recent method, called mass adaptation, is taken here. "Technologies and systems fordistribution" can be characterized as mass adaptation to the demands of individual customerswho achieve an almost massive output performance. The purpose of this definition isprimarily to recognize and meet customer requirements in ways that are almost as effective asmass production. The notion of individualized products having to carry expenses that aretraditionally related to customization is parallel to this principle. [1]In 1987, Stan Davis related to the principle 'retail specialization' in which “the same hugenumber of customers can be served as in the commodity markets of the industrialized world,but at the same time being viewed differently than in the tailored markets of preindustrialeconomies”.The aim of mass customization is to create, manufacture, sell and distribute inexpensiveproducts and services with enough variation and flexibility that almost everybody finds justwhat he / she needs. Thus, three important conditions are necessary for the effective pursuitof mass customization:An organization aiming for large-scale personalization will specifically consider thespecific desires of its consumers.An organization also should be able to enforce mass personalization on its consumers,preferably without prices, time and efficiency restrictions.Thirdly and finally, to ensure that mass customization is deemed effective, theorganization must be willing, though reducing the consumer's decision, to assist eachconsumer in finding his own solution.Mass adaptation is based on a number of approaches. One of the most frequently used formsis postponement. Delaying the form means delaying the time when the product family ismade and distributed by taking their unique identity into account. Therefore, at a later stagein the production and distribution cycle one or more specialization operations are needed toprotect those endpoint areas. Three different types of form postponement can be identified
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