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Distributed Database Systems and Object Orientation

   

Added on  2019-09-22

22 Pages6749 Words126 Views
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<University>EXPLANATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FORTHE WINE CELLAR DATABASEbyStudent Number: Module Name: Submission Deadline: 15th March 2017<Lecturer’s Name and Course Number> <Your Name> <Your Student Number> 20171 of 22
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Table of ContentsExplanations and Recommendations for The Wine Cellar Database.............................5Task 1.............................................................................................................................6Limitations of Relational Databases for The Wine Cellar Scenario..........................6Data Warehouse and Their Support in Decision-Making..........................................8Issues in Designing and Implementing a Data Warehouse........................................9Data Structure Model for The Wine Cellar Scenario...............................................10Task 2...........................................................................................................................12Distributed Databases and Potential Issues Before Final Design Decisions............12Relevance of Distributed Database for The Wine Cellar Organization and Costs/Benefits...........................................................................................................14Recommendation of Type of Distributed Database and Justifications....................15Task 3...........................................................................................................................15How Relational Databases Support Object Oriented Development?.......................15Relational Databases Relevance for Multimedia Requirements in The Wine Cellar Scenario....................................................................................................................16Conclusion....................................................................................................................17References....................................................................................................................19 <Your Name> <Your Student Number> 20172 of 22
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Data is the oil that runs the machinery of the present-day society. Data is everywhere,and new is being generated every moment from many sources. Being able to store andretrieve data in an efficient way is an essential requirement for the success of anyorganisation. Also, different databases are optimised for different roles. Some may beoptimised for read-heavy operations, while others may be optimised for write-heavyoperations. Optimising one parameter entails a drawback in other parameters. Also,the underlying structure of a database system has a significant bearing on theapplications. This paper deals with the new requirements of a (fictitious) company inEngland, which is engaged in sourcing wine and accessories from all over the worldand selling them. The company has experienced growth in the recent years and hasopened branches throughout the country. However, the database handling is stillkeeping in mind a single location. The consequence has been the delay and manualeffort required in compiling company-wide reports. In addition to the reportingrequirement, the company also wants to promote selected products via short videos ona website. This paper details the various database technologies and providesrecommendations for the new scenarios of reporting and multimedia promotionswhich have cropped up for The Wine Cellar. <Your Name> <Your Student Number> 20173 of 22
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Explanations and Recommendations for The Wine Cellar DatabaseData is the new oil (Toonders 2014), and this implies a likewise importance to the means for managing data. Data needs to be stored, edited, deleted, copied and retrieved to be of relevance to the success of a business or an organisation. All of these operations to the data need to be done in a performant way. If data is not handled efficiently, then instead of becoming a competitive advantage and blooming to its full potential, data becomes additional work without the benefits (Jones 2016). The means of managing the data (including the data itself, paradigms, schemas, and the software used) come under the term of databases (Gupta 2011, p.5). Databases are thus a solution to our world's requirement for storing significant amounts of data and retrieving it quickly and accurately (Ward and Dafoulas 2006, p.2). Databases are of many types and have been evolving since their inception in the 1970s (Ward and Dafoulas 2006, p.2), and many variants have been developed, each with its advantages and shortcomings. Some of the types of databases are flat-file, relational, distributed, NoSQL, and others (Data Warehouses 2012). It is not the case that one type of a database management system (DBMS) is intrinsically better than another, but each is suited to some particular scenarios. Since efficiency is an essential requirement for the database, the scenario at hand needs to be considered before selecting a particular database.This paper is about the database requirements of a (fictitious) company that operates in England. This company, The Wine Cellar is engaged in selling a selection of fine wine, spirits and accessories. The company arranges wines and accessories to sell from sellers all over the world. The company has experienced growth in the last few years with the resulting expansion. The company now operates from many branches within England. Each branch maintains its private database and submits a summary file each week to the head office at the end of every week. This submission from silo-like databases at each outlet does fulfil the requirements for the data at the head office, but the turnaround time is very high. Currently, the individual files are analysed individually, and the results are amalgamated. Also, this process is labour-intensive, both at the branch and the head-office level. Given the growth and <Your Name> <Your Student Number> 20175 of 22
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expansion of The Wine Cellar and the future potential, timely and accurate data is critical. The management will be better equipped to make company-wide strategic decisions if the company-wide information is easily available at short notice. This agility in data querying is something that the current solution cannot provide. Also, the company would like to promote selected products by showcasing short videos via a website. These two requirements will be attended to in the paper, in addition to providing a theoretical knowhow of the database technologies relevant to the discussion.The Information Technology (IT) team of The Wine Cellar is skilled in relational database design, and this skill-set served the company well until recently. However, keeping in mind the recent growth and the future possibilities, the IT team will have to expand their skill set to include some new technologies, or some new hires with therelevant skills will have to be made. The company is more interested in training and increasing the skills of the current team. This paper will look into these new technologies and will suggest ways in which the existing experience of the team can be utilised while developing new ones.Task 1Limitations of Relational Databases for The Wine Cellar ScenarioIn the relational database paradigm, data is represented in the form of tables, and relations among the tables help enforce data consistency (Rouse 2006). In the process of developing relational database schema for a scenario, the entities to be represented in the database are identified first. Then, the parameters of these entities are recognised and finally the relations among them, so that there is no duplication of dataand any information about any entity is linked and can be traced. Such a paradigm allows for naturally enforcing constraints. This system was proposed in the 70s by E.F. Codd (Codd 1982, pp.109-117). Relational Database is implemented via tables, columns, rows, primary keys, and foreign keys. In other words, tables represent entities (e.g. products, customers), columns represent parameters about the entities (e.g. product name, manufacturing date, volume). The rows represent one particular <Your Name> <Your Student Number> 20176 of 22
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