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Stem Cell Treatment for Spinal Cord Injuries: Design and Conduct of Experiments

   

Added on  2019-09-23

4 Pages1144 Words301 Views
Contents1. Background..............................................................................................................................................22.0 Literature search...................................................................................................................................23.0 Design and conduct of experiments......................................................................................................34.0. Discussion.............................................................................................................................................35.0. Conclusions.........................................................................................................................................................3 References...................................................................................................................................................41

Biology and Technology in the Real World1.0 BackgroundStem cell treatments have been expected to bring significant advantage to patients enduring anextensive variety of sicknesses and wounds. It was expected that the advantages of bone marrowtransplants for patients requiring recreation of their hematopoietic and safe frameworks wouldapply to stem cell transplants of other cell sorts, and good faith has been high for the use ofpluripotent undifferentiated cell sorts (embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells)for an assortment of uses. Undeveloped cells multiply, move, and separate to frame living beingsamid embryogenesis. During adulthood, undifferentiated cells are available inside tissues/organsincluding the focal sensory system, where they may separate into neurons (Tewarie et al., 2009).The stem cells are derived from a several sources in the body including embryo (early phases ofadvancement); fetus; umbilical line; placenta and grown-up undeveloped cells (Morrison et al.,1995). Since the identification and portrayal of stem cells is in primitive stage, a lot of interesthas been given to their potential for treatment of spinal cord damage, traumatic brain harm, anddegenerative cerebrum infections (Polak and Bishop, 2006).2.0 Literature searchStem cells have potential to develop to either remain a stem cell or become another type of cellwith a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell. Theunspecialized cells are capable of renewing themselves via cell division, sometimes after longperiods of inactivity. In addition, the cells can be induced to become tissue or organ-specificcells with special functions. The cells can be distinguished in to embryonic stem cells and non-embryonic "somatic" or "adult" stem cells. Rippon et al., (2006) developed multistepdifferentiation strategy to develop distal lung epithelial progenitors from murine embryonic stemcells. The model serves as an in vitro model for the study of lung epithelial differentiation.Lescaudron et al., (2012) opined that the use of stem cells is valuable tool for the mitigation ofneurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's or Huntington’s diseases based on the outcomedespite of limitations (ethical concerns such as isolation of fetal brain tissue). Vawda et al.,(2012) reported the use of different sources and types of cells (embryonic stem cells, neuralprogenitor cells, bone marrow mesenchymal cells and non-stem cells) for spinal cord injuries.2

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